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CRISIS NUMBERS

Metro Phoenix

602.244.0089

602.889.1610 (TDD)

Out of Town

888.886.8793

888.886.8794 (TDD)

Pet Companion Shelter

Passion for Pets, Pet Parents and Protection

The Care Gap

Pet abuse and domestic violence go hand in hand. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, more than 40% of domestic violence victims do not escape their abusers because they are concerned about what will happen to their pets when they leave.

Prior to Sojourner Center, there had been no domestic violence shelters in Maricopa County that allowed pets unless the pet was a service animal, leaving pet parents with the dreadful decision to save themselves at the risk of their pet being abused, tortured or killed or to not leave at all.

As Sojourner Center learned of the role that safeguarding pets plays in protecting almost half of abused women, we knew we had to do more.

Our Solution

For pet owners impacted by domestic violence, Sojourner Center and its partner Lost Our Home Pet Rescue are piloting the first concurrent pet shelter program in Maricopa County at Sojourner Center. This program will be essential in providing a comprehensive care continuum for the entire family and loving family pet.

The program provides comfortable shelter, basic daily care, exercise for dogs and cats, and special accommodations for other types of family pets such as birds and fish. Pet therapy is an important component of the program, allowing pets a safe place to heal alongside their owners. A workforce readiness program prepares interested domestic violence survivors in a career working with companion pets.

About Our Partners

Lost Our Home Pet Rescue
Founded in 2008, with a mission to ensure that all pets have loving homes when families face major life challenges, and to rescue abandoned pets. In six years, Lost Our Home Pet Rescue has rescued and provided homes for almost 3,000 pets, and have kept over 30 pets with their families through their Temporary Care Program.

Supporters
The AKC Humane Fund, RedRover, PetSmart Corporation and Lulu’s Fund, a program of the Timothy T. Day Foundation, generously support pet programs at Sojourner Center.

F.A.Q

Q: What is the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter?
A: The Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter offers shelter and care for the pets of women and children residing at Sojourner Center. The facility can accommodate eight dogs and eight cats, with special accommodations for other types of family pets such as birds and fish. Pet parents who are staying at the shelter are responsible for feeding, exercising and socializing with their pet at least twice a day. Sojourner Center is the first domestic violence shelter in the Phoenix-area to allow women to bring their pets with them.

Q: Why is the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter needed?
A: Pet abuse and domestic violence go hand in hand with research demonstrating that 71% of abused women reported that the abuser threatened, harmed or killed family pets. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, more than 40% of domestic violence victims do not escape their abusers because they are concerned about what will happen to their pets when they leave.

Q: Who is Sojourner Center’s partner for the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter?
A: The program is a venture with Sojourner Center’s partner, Lost Our Home Pet Rescue, a Phoenix- based pet shelter that enables families in crises to keep their pets. The Pet Companion Shelter builds on Sojourner Center’s partnership with Lost Our Home Rescue, dating back to 2008, providing shelter to pets of participants.

Q: What are the other components of the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter?
A: In addition to the on-site pet care program, Sojourner Center and Lost Our Home Pet Rescue have introduced a pet therapy program, allowing all shelter residents to receive the therapeutic benefits of pet therapy; programs for residents to teach responsible pet care; a workforce readiness program to teach animal-related job skills; and a foster pet care program for pets of domestic violence survivors who are not living at Sojourner Center.

Q: How does the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter fit into the organization’s strategic plan?
A: In 2014, Sojourner Center launched a Five-Year Strategic Plan to strengthen its core programs and direct services for women and children while expanding its care continuum to not only treat but also end the cycle of domestic violence. The Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter is essential in addressing the significant role that safeguarding pets plays in protecting women affected by domestic violence, providing care for the entire family and loving family pet.

Q: How is the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter funded?
A: The AKC Humane Fund, RedRover and PetSmart generously support the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter. Most recently, we announced a $50,000 gift from PetSmart to support this initiative.

Q: Who is Petey?
A: Petey is a lovable rescue puppy adopted from Lost Our Home this March by Sojourner Center’s Chief Advancement Officer, Teri Hauser, and an unofficial mascot for the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter. After undergoing immediate surgery to amputate an injured paw, Petey quickly gained a following on social media, capturing the hearts of many in Phoenix. You can learn more about Petey’s heartwarming story in this Arizona Republic article.

Key Statistics

  • In 85% of homes where a woman or child is being abused there is also a pet that suffers abuse (Falk, 2004)
  • Up to 71% of women with pets who enter a shelter reported that their abuser had injured, maimed, killed or threatened the family pet (Facts About Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence, 2014)
  • One study found that 85% of women and 63% of children reported incidents of pet abuse after arriving at a shelter (Ascione, 1997)

References
Falk, A. M. (2004, March 15). A Pet Column for the Week. Animal and domestic abuse: a sobering connection.

Facts About Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence (2014).

Ascione, F.R., Weber, C. V. & Wood, D. S. (1997). The abuse of animals and domestic violence: A national survey of shelters for women who are battered. Society & Animals, 5(3), 205-218.

Passion for Pets, Pet Parents and Protection

The Care Gap

Pet abuse and domestic violence go hand in hand. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, more than 40% of domestic violence victims do not escape their abusers because they are concerned about what will happen to their pets when they leave.

Prior to Sojourner Center, there had been no domestic violence shelters in Maricopa County that allowed pets unless the pet was a service animal, leaving pet parents with the dreadful decision to save themselves at the risk of their pet being abused, tortured or killed or to not leave at all.

As Sojourner Center learned of the role that safeguarding pets plays in protecting almost half of abused women, we knew we had to do more.

Our Solution

For pet owners impacted by domestic violence, Sojourner Center and its partner Lost Our Home Pet Rescue are piloting the first concurrent pet shelter program in Maricopa County at Sojourner Center. This program will be essential in providing a comprehensive care continuum for the entire family and loving family pet.

The program provides comfortable shelter, basic daily care, exercise for dogs and cats, and special accommodations for other types of family pets such as birds and fish. Pet therapy is an important component of the program, allowing pets a safe place to heal alongside their owners. A workforce readiness program prepares interested domestic violence survivors in a career working with companion pets.

About Our Partners

Lost Our Home Pet Rescue
Founded in 2008, with a mission to ensure that all pets have loving homes when families face major life challenges, and to rescue abandoned pets. In six years, Lost Our Home Pet Rescue has rescued and provided homes for almost 3,000 pets, and have kept over 30 pets with their families through their Temporary Care Program.

Supporters
The AKC Humane Fund, RedRover, PetSmart Corporation and Lulu’s Fund, a program of the Timothy T. Day Foundation, generously support pet programs at Sojourner Center.

Key Statistics

  • In 85% of homes where a woman or child is being abused there is also a pet that suffers abuse (Falk, 2004)
  • Up to 71% of women with pets who enter a shelter reported that their abuser had injured, maimed, killed or threatened the family pet (Facts About Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence, 2014)
  • One study found that 85% of women and 63% of children reported incidents of pet abuse after arriving at a shelter (Ascione, 1997)

F.A.Q

Q: What is the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter?
A: The Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter offers shelter and care for the pets of women and children residing at Sojourner Center. The facility can accommodate eight dogs and eight cats, with special accommodations for other types of family pets such as birds and fish. Pet parents who are staying at the shelter are responsible for feeding, exercising and socializing with their pet at least twice a day. Sojourner Center is the first domestic violence shelter in the Phoenix-area to allow women to bring their pets with them.

Q: Why is the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter needed?
A: Pet abuse and domestic violence go hand in hand with research demonstrating that 71% of abused women reported that the abuser threatened, harmed or killed family pets. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, more than 40% of domestic violence victims do not escape their abusers because they are concerned about what will happen to their pets when they leave.

Q: Who is Sojourner Center’s partner for the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter?
A: The program is a venture with Sojourner Center’s partner, Lost Our Home Pet Rescue, a Phoenix- based pet shelter that enables families in crises to keep their pets. The Pet Companion Shelter builds on Sojourner Center’s partnership with Lost Our Home Rescue, dating back to 2008, providing shelter to pets of participants.

Q: What are the other components of the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter?
A: In addition to the on-site pet care program, Sojourner Center and Lost Our Home Pet Rescue have introduced a pet therapy program, allowing all shelter residents to receive the therapeutic benefits of pet therapy; programs for residents to teach responsible pet care; a workforce readiness program to teach animal-related job skills; and a foster pet care program for pets of domestic violence survivors who are not living at Sojourner Center.

Q: How does the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter fit into the organization’s strategic plan?
A: In 2014, Sojourner Center launched a Five-Year Strategic Plan to strengthen its core programs and direct services for women and children while expanding its care continuum to not only treat but also end the cycle of domestic violence. The Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter is essential in addressing the significant role that safeguarding pets plays in protecting women affected by domestic violence, providing care for the entire family and loving family pet.

Q: How is the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter funded?
A: The AKC Humane Fund, RedRover and PetSmart generously support the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter. Most recently, we announced a $50,000 gift from PetSmart to support this initiative.

Q: Who is Petey?
A: Petey is a lovable rescue puppy adopted from Lost Our Home this March by Sojourner Center’s Chief Advancement Officer, Teri Hauser, and an unofficial mascot for the Sojourner Pet Companion Shelter. After undergoing immediate surgery to amputate an injured paw, Petey quickly gained a following on social media, capturing the hearts of many in Phoenix. You can learn more about Petey’s heartwarming story in this Arizona Republic article.

References
Falk, A. M. (2004, March 15). A Pet Column for the Week. Animal and domestic abuse: a sobering connection.

Facts About Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence (2014).

Ascione, F.R., Weber, C. V. & Wood, D. S. (1997). The abuse of animals and domestic violence: A national survey of shelters for women who are battered. Society & Animals, 5(3), 205-218.